Sony: PS3 is the “first console to offer Amazon Instant Video”

April 3, 2012

Sony: PS3 is the “first console to offer Amazon Instant Video”Earlier today Sony quietly dropped the Amazon Instant Video app on everyone’s PS3 in the TV/Video section of the Cross Media Bar (XMB). The app offers users access to over 120,000 videos through Amazon’s service.

According to the PlayStation Blog, Amazon Instant Video will provide thousands of videos for purchase and rent which include TV shows and movies. Amazon Prime members will be able to stream over 17,000 Instant videos for free.

Amazon Prime membership is $79 per year which comes out to $6.58 per month for the streaming video service and free shipping on products ordered through Amazon.

As one user asked on the PlayStation Blog – what does Amazon Instant Video offer over Netflix and Hulu? For one, the service offers the largest selection of movies for rental and purchase as the vast majority of the titles sold on Amazon.com is available through the Instant Video app.

Secondly, Amazon offers TV shows for Prime Members not available on Netflix and Hulu such as: Game of Thrones, Walking Dead, Hugo and more.

Between Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Instant Video all through the PS3, you may just be able to ditch your cable TV service altogether now.

32 Responses to “Sony: PS3 is the “first console to offer Amazon Instant Video””

  1. CarlB:

    ” what does Amazon Instant Video offer over Netflix and Hulu?”

    I don’t know about Hulu, but as far as what it offers over Netflix and Vudu, very little… or less depending on how you look at it, seeing as how they charge you premium prices for shows you can get for a lot less on Netflix, like Season 1 of Walking Dead.

    Considering they offer less than half of what comes with Netflix, it also looks like they will offer to charge you premium prices for those 18,000 titles it’s missing.

    “Secondly, Amazon offers TV shows for Prime Members not available on Netflix and Hulu such as: Game of Thrones, Walking Dead, Hugo and more.”

    For whatever’s not on Netflix, Vudu has it covered with what is still the largest selection of HD content for the same price as what Amazon will charge you. Not like I’d pay $3.99 per HD episode of Game of Thrones though.

  2. CarlB:

    “you may just be able to ditch your cable TV service altogether now.”

    Already did a while back. The really good news about this is that hopefully we’ll have a price war between Vudu and Prime.

  3. greenLanternfan:

    I wonder if the 360 will have amazon instant video later on?

  4. phranctoast:

    Vudu lacks a subscription service. In that way Prime and Netflix beat it out. Prime being the best as it has both options.
    I do like how Vudu will unlock my BRD collection on their cloud for $2/disc.
    Amazon needs to step up and do something similar for discs bought on their site. The only negative I could see is fracturing your collection on two separate services. Not that I think Amazon or Walmart are going anywhere anytime soon.

  5. Roca.:

    “I do like how Vudu will unlock my BRD collection on their cloud for $2/disc. Amazon needs to step up and do something similar for discs bought on their site”

    I think that’s the future of streaming…

  6. phranctoast:

    It is the best option I’ve heard of to get your current collection future proofed and setup for mobile streaming.

    It would be nice if Amazon could offer Prime/cloud unlock for any BRD purchased through them for a comparative price ($2).

    “I think that’s the future of streaming…”

    I’ve always said that Sony should do something similar through PSN with a subscription. I even mentioned buying a PSN movie and getting the BRD shipped to you for a small fee as an option then too.

  7. Roca.:

    @Phranc
    If Amazon does that it will spread like wildfire. IMO Vudu is the best streaming service (for picture and sound quality) but Walmarts are always far away from big cities.

    If Amazon offers this it will be easier & convenient for everyone, as you can get everything done from your house and start streaming the cloud version within seconds.

    as for “subscription” based streaming services. I think there will never be one that will offer you all the content you need. Everyone is doing their own thing – HBO, Cinemax, Starz, Comcast, Dish, Warner Bros, etc. – Netflix will still offer the biggest library of older content.

  8. phranctoast:

    “Everyone is doing their own thing – HBO, Cinemax, Starz,””

    This annoys me. I wouldn’t mind now if they offered a low cost streaming option not tied to a cable sub.

    In fact, other than using the services on mobile device these services are pretty much useless, as you would already have the service through the cable provider.

    The only benefit I could see is the potential to get rid of a cable box and use a console instead but we see how that didn’t even work with MS trying to get TV on the 360 as it was extremely limited. Is anyone going to get rid of a $5/month box in their room for inferior options? Maybe CB ;)

  9. Roca.:

    Cable companies need to adopt a better subscription model…one that lets you pay for the channels you want – à la carte channel package (pay per channel) for a monthly price.

    Let’s $10 standard fee for basic cable (mandatory). if you want to add more channels you can pay a little more (per channel).

    For Example:
    Regular channels = $0.5 per channel
    Premium channels = $3 per channel

    So lets say you only want the following channels:
    Regular channels (x10)
    -ESPN
    -SPIKE
    -ABC
    -NBC
    -CBS
    -TNT
    -YES Network
    -FOX
    -CNN
    -Cartoon Network

    Premium Channels (x3)
    -HBO*
    -Starz*
    -AMC*

    Total monthly cost = $24
    $10 (standard fee) + $5 (10 channels) + $9 (3 premium)

    That’s much better then having us pay $70+ for a 150-channel package that’s full of channels we don’t give a shit about – like Lifetime, E!, MTV (do they even play music anymore), etc

  10. CarlB:

    You only pay $5/mo for your cable subscription?
    Wow. You must have really talked them down ;)

    Yes, plenty of people have already gotten rid of their $30-$100+ cable subscriptions (and rip-off contracts that raise the price after the first few months to 1st year) and just use the $8/mo subscription to Netflix or other cheaper alternatives using the internet connection and gear they already have and would have regardless.

    It’s not the best option for those people who just can’t live without seeing everything NEW as soon as it comes out, but for people who realize paying ridiculous premiums for those cable options just isn’t necessary as they can eventually watch everything for much less, streaming and other options are just fine.

    Unless studios and companies price them out of making streaming a feasible business (which is still a very real possibility), there is still enough good content to justify $8/mo.

    “Millions abandon cable TV for streaming services”

    http://tv.yahoo.com/news/millions-abandon-cable-tv-streaming-services-004208398.html

    Cable companies want to hold on to every bit of revenue they have made in the past, but unfortunately that’s not going to happen. Now they are just trying to see how much they can get away with to still make plenty of money without having to radically change their business model, so we will continue to see less than satisfying results like what HBO, Cinemax, and Starz are trying to do.

  11. CarlB:

    “unfortunately that’s not going to happen”

    *fortunately that’s not going to happen*

  12. phranctoast:

    “Cable companies need to adopt a better subscription model…one that lets you pay for the channels you want – à la carte channel package (pay per channel) for a monthly price.”

    Maybe if more people took CarlB’s approach and got rid of their service provider for TV and only paid for internet this might happen. As it is now I can’t see even 1% doing that.

  13. CarlB:

    Millions abandoning cable isn’t a bad start. Last year marks the first time they ever lost subscribers instead of gaining them in the industry’s history.

  14. phranctoast:

    “. Last year marks the first time they ever lost subscribers instead of gaining them in the industry’s history.”

    True, but we don’t know the impact of satellite services either on that number.

    It was also 2.7M over four years or roughly 650-700K a year. In the grand scheme of things it seems minuscule to the amount of people still paying.

  15. CarlB:

    They included satellite services in their estimate of total revenue.

    “We estimate:

    Kiosks represented 19%
    Mail 25%
    Online Subscription (Hulu Plus & Netflix) 13%
    Online Transactional 2%
    Store 20%
    VOD (Cable, Satellite, Telco TV) 21%

    …of 2011 US Movie/TV Rental market revenue and forecast:

    Kiosk 22%
    Mail 16%
    Online Subscription (Hulu Plus & Netflix) 25%
    Online Transactional 3%
    Store 13%
    VOD 21%

    for 2012.”

    Over half of these didn’t even exist 10 years ago, and they have already taken over half of total revenue.

    “As it is now I can’t see even 1% doing that.”

    It’s already over 1% and is growing substantially.

    “we estimate 2.65 million (2.6%) US TV subscribers
    cut their TV subscriptions 2008-11 to rely solely on Online, Netflix, OTA, etc, 1.05 million (1%) in 2011 alone. We forecast cord cutters will reach 3.58 million year end (3.6%) 2012.”

    http://www.convergenceonline.com/downloads/NewContent2012.pdf

    Unless cable companies, including satellite providers, reduce prices significantly and make some meaningful changes to the way they do business, I don’t think the growth in digital streaming and other alternatives is going to just stop, and ~1% growth per year now may seem “miniscule”, but it adds up over time if allowed to continue.

  16. phranctoast:

    “They included satellite services in their estimate of total RENTAL revenue.”

    Corrected.

    ““we estimate 2.65 million (2.6%) US TV subscribers
    cut their TV subscriptions 2008-11 to rely solely on Online, Netflix, OTA, etc, 1.05 million (1%) in 2011 alone. We forecast cord cutters will reach 3.58 million year end (3.6%) 2012.”

    My bad. I thought there were more than 100M us tv subscribers (cable, satellite, telco)

  17. ncaissie:

    I have tried to talk my wife into droping it but she wants it for the kids. I don’t think they need it. Although our Internet provider is the cable provider and they will see the increase in things like netflix and choke our Internet. Plus the Internet sucks currently. It drops connection a lot so we would be sol.

  18. Roca.:

    I’m sure there are more people using Netflix along with cable…than those who’ve cut their cable sub to use Netflix instead.

  19. phranctoast:

    “I’m sure there are more people using Netflix along with cable…than those who’ve cut their cable sub to use Netflix instead.”

    Most definitely.

    I’d also say that if not for bandwidth caps more people would have dropped cable.

    For future reference, when I talk of “cable” I’m including Telco in there.

    This here has cable+telco over 100M
    http://www.ncta.com/Statistics.aspx
    Without the added Satellite service which makes up for 25% of the marketshare.

  20. Roca.:

    I have Netflix, Hulu+, Amazon Instant, Google TV (many apps for anime shows)…and I still have my cable subscription for ESPN (watched the Lakers game yesterday night), ABC, Showtime, AMC, FOX, NFL/NBA/MLB games, TNT, Comedy Central and many other channels and I enjoy watching here and there.

  21. dans303:

    “yesterday night”

    Is that a common phrase in America?

  22. phranctoast:

    lol

  23. Roca.:

    last night ;)

  24. CarlB:

    “I’m including Telco in there”

    So am I. According this latest report, which includes satellite and telco, my previous link was being more than generous in their estimates.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/cable-satellite-tv-earnings-reports-16040863#.T33a4MUge8o

    Of course there are still more people using Netflix streaming with their cable tv subscription, it’s still in transition and growing. The point is it’s taking away business from the cable tv companies that was previously their sole domain.

    Another point is that apparently more people (like roca) are realizing cable tv alone isn’t good enough for their needs so they are continuing to subscribe to Netflix and other streaming options in addition to what they already have.

  25. CarlB:

    The good news for cable, sat, and telco companies is that their hi-speed internet subscriptions are still growing partly because of streaming and digital subcription alternatives to cable tv subs.

  26. phranctoast:

    According to that report the additions are more than the losses.
    549K additions and 205K losses.

    The bad news for the consumer is I fear bandwidth caps if too many people drop cable in favor of streaming only. They’ll have an unlimited Bandwidth option but it will put people in the range of paying for cable anyway.

    *Hopes this doesn’t happen.

  27. dans303:

    I just finished the last episode of Spartacus. Pretty mad ending! Can’t wait for the next season! :D

  28. CarlB:

    Bandwidth caps where I live seem to have come and gone. Of course this is SoCal, so we may be slightly ahead of the curve in respect to the rest of the country, but it’s only a matter of time before this trend spreads.

    I think the problem was there wasn’t enough infrastructure, capable tech, and hubs before, and now there is an abundance. The companies that had caps here lost business to the companies that didn’t. Got to love the free market.

    I’ve also read that somewhere around 2020-2025 we’ll have average speeds of 100Mb/s, so considering I’m already watching streaming HD video for $37/mo with my Netflix subscription and the tech is continuously adapting with the load over time, I don’t see caps coming back, and if they do, it won’t be for very long unless they are priced substantially less than what they were.

    “There are already huge swaths of Sweden, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and other territories that are connected at symmetrical speeds between 50Mbps and 1Gbps via VDSL, Ethernet, and fiber — and judging by the worldwide government-level pressure and funding, more countries are sure to follow.”

    http://www.extremetech.com/computing/94428-will-100-megabit-internet-connections-destroy-the-web-as-we-know-it

    With connections that fast potentially inherent to the infrastructure, I don’t see there will be a real necessity for any caps. Considering some countries are already declaring the internet a right and making broadband free, we may not even be charged for broadband within a decade, or even have a need to pay for services like Netflix.

  29. phranctoast:

    “I just finished the last episode of Spartacus. Pretty mad ending! Can’t wait for the next season!”

    “Blood rains down on an angry sky, my cock rages on, my cock rages on …”

  30. phranctoast:

    “With connections that fast potentially inherent to the infrastructure, I don’t see there will be a real necessity for any caps. Considering some countries are already declaring the internet a right and making broadband free, we may not even be charged for broadband within a decade, or even have a need to pay for services like Netflix.”

    I think I read somewhere that theres a country with free wireless.

  31. CarlB:

    South Korea.

    http://www.advancedtechnologykorea.com/7755

  32. CarlB:

    Finland is probably soon to follow in coverage:

    “Finland made an impression making it to 5th place this year after being ranked 12th last year. This year they were recognized for being the first country to make broadband access a legal right for citizens.”

    Also in the UK there seems to be an interesting development where an ISP is providing 10,000 wi-fi hotspots for it’s existing customers, it’s not free, but definitely a significant improvement in capability for the same price:

    “Sky announces free Wi-Fi hotspots with The Cloud
    Unlimited, auto-connecting internet access at thousands of locations”:

    http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/broadband/3349123/sky-announces-free-wi-fi-hotspots-with-cloud/

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